Quantcast WeN2K.com/Prototype Nokia Cell Phone Recharges...<br> Without Wires

6/17/2009 05:37:23
by WeN2K News

WeNeed2Know!Lifetime Post!

Prototype Nokia Cell Phone Recharges...
Without Wires


Join Free! Bookmark and Share Post Now!




Pardon the cliche, but it's one of the holiest of Holy Grails of technology: Wireless power. And while early lab experiments have been able to "beam" electricity a few feet to power a light bulb, the day when our laptops and cell phones can charge without having to plug them in to a wall socket still seems decades in the future.

Nokia, however, has taken another baby step in that direction with the invention of a cell phone that recharges itself using a unique system: It harvests ambient radio waves from the air, and turns that energy into usable power. Enough, at least, to keep a cell phone from running out of juice.

While "traditional" (if there is such a thing) wireless power systems are specifically designed with a transmitter and receiver in mind, Nokia's system isn't finicky about where it gets its wireless waves. TV, radio, other mobile phone systems -- all of this stuff just bounces around the air and most of it is wasted, absorbed into the environment or scattered into the ether. Nokia picks up all the bits and pieces of these waves and uses the collected electromagnetic energy to create electrical current, then uses that to recharge the phone's battery. A huge range of frequencies can be utilized by the system (there's no other way, really, as the energy in any given wave is infinitesimal). It's the same idea that Tesla was exploring 100 years ago, just on a tiny scale.


Nikola Tesla's designed a method for the wireless transmission of electricity...over 100 years ago!

Mind you, harvesting ambient electromagnetic energy is never going to offer enough electricity to power your whole house or office, but it just might be enough to keep a cell phone alive and kicking. Currently Nokia is able to harvest all of 5 milliwatts from the air; the goal is to increase that to 20 milliwatts in the short term and 50 milliwatts down the line. That wouldn't be enough to keep the phone alive during an active call, but would be enough to slowly recharge the cell phone battery while it's in standby mode, theoretically offering infinite power -- provided you're not stuck deep underground where radio waves can't penetrate.

Nokia says it hopes to commercialize the technology in three to five years.

WeN2K Commentary
Is this yet another example of currently available technology being kept from the public to maximize cell phone company profits? There's no doubt that the popular cell phone providers make absolutely exorbitant profits for leasing us air-time - and for the relatively simple services utilizing existing lines they've (and NOW we have) already paid for a long, long time ago. We'll not even talk about the ridiculous money they make for (double) charging people for text messages! How'd they sell us that one? They charge us for soon-to-be obsolete hardware and constantly, over and over again for abstract software. THIS is the model of pure capitalism!

Cell phone providers, insurance companies and city departments of motor vehicles are cash cows that seem to make way too much money for seemingly nothing...as vast, elite fortunes are being made off the endless smoke and mirrors and three-card monte card shuffling. The truth is you have to pay to play in this world. You can't communicate, live or drive for free; and we don't expect to anymore. But aren't we aware enough to know when we're being played like used drums in a high school band? Will we ever get to a point where technology isn't an enemy to us...either directly, mentally or, unnecessarily, in our pocket books? Is there anything we (the people) can do to DEMAND pervasively useful technology NOW! Or will we forever be at the whim of the capital games?


Should We Have To Wait Years for Available Technology?

Comment On This Story!



WeN2K World Video News


581 Views!
Respond/Comment





2019 WeN2K.com. All rights reserved. policy